Zen Buddhism

Dhammapada

In the same way that rain breaks into a house with a bad roof, desire breaks into the mind that has not been practising meditation. While in the same way that rain cannot break into a well-roofed house, desire cannot break into a mind that has been practising meditation well.

Monks behaving badly

Shouting, burning books, cutting off fingers, falling off a 10' pole, no doubt about it, these are the punk rockers of Buddhism.

Koans are a part of formal training in Zen Buddhism and although several collections have been published it it critical to understand:

Koan can be translated a public record or public case and on the surface Koans read very much like fables or short stories.

There are several collections of Koans and a partial listing includes:

  • The Shaseki-shu (Collection of Stone and Sand)
  • The Mumonkan (The Gateless Gate)
  • The Shoyo Roku (The Book of Serenity)
  • The Hekiganroku (Records of Blue Rock Temple or Blue Cliff Record>)
  • Exploring Koans

    Although some Koans may seem easier to understand then others, reading a Koan is akin to hitting a brick wall. How to pass through the 'Gateless gate'?

    First, some Koans are a bit easier then others and if you are new to Koans I highly suggest you start with the Collection of Stone and Sand.

    To be continued ...