Industries

Make Learning Coding Fun for Kids

In a technology-focused world like the one we live in, coding is an invaluable skill for any child to learn. Luckily, there are countless resources out there that allow kids to learn how to code in a fun, accessible way that they can build into more advanced knowledge down the road.

One of the best ways to learn code for kids is through games and other online programs that give the building blocks for coding. Some of these can even be played and enjoyed (with a little assistance from parents or another mentor) by kids as young as four years old. 

Code Combat

This is an online game that teaches kids about JavaScript and Python as they make their way through an action RPG-style game. The earlier levels are completely free, though there is a subscription for later levels and more advanced curriculum.

This sort of resource is great because it allows kids to learn about coding without feeling like they’re in class. It takes something fun like a game and combines it with important life skills.

Code.org

This is a free website that teaches children coding through a myriad of puzzles, activities, and videos, ranging from the very first course, which is intended for early readers, all the way up to more advanced courses. 

It uses blocks to teach kids programming, but as students become more advanced, they have the option to turn on text-based code and solve the puzzles and activities using that instead.

Scratch and Scratch Jr

Created by students at MIT, these are two programs that also use a block-based approach to teach coding principles. Scratch is aimed at slightly older children, starting from around 8 years old up until high school, while Scratch Jr is for kids as young as four years old. 

Both of them are excellent introductions to coding, as they allow students to learn a new language gradually in a very visual way. Instead of confusing lines of text, you get blocks that snap together and a fun companion character helping you out along the way.

Tynker

Tynker is another option that requires a paid subscription to access the more advanced lessons. You get 20 free ones, but then you have to pay. However, Tynker offers such a wide variety of activities and lessons that you really can’t go wrong giving it a try.

Kids can do everything from play programming games, using a similar block-based design that others on this list use, to eventually programming drones and even creating their own games using real coding languages like Python and JavaScript.

Codemoji

This is another fun, interactive coding game that allows kids to use emojis to code. Like many of the others on this list, it has a free trial but after that, there is an annual subscription fee. It’s a way to introduce the basics in a fun, relatable way. Plus, emojis are just a lot of fun to play around with.

Because it’s very image-based, Codemoji is accessible for younger kids who aren’t yet proficient in typing or reading.

The options we’ve listed here only scratch the surface in terms of the programs available to teach kids how to code, but hopefully, we’ve given you a good idea of how to get started. Happy learning!

Join The Discussion